Thursday, April 16, 2009

12-24 (2009)

12-24 (2009)

Holiday horrors.
View it here.

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Tuesday, April 14, 2009

Terminator Salvation (2009)

Terminator Salvation (2009)

Nuff said. Watch it.

Check it out here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UPrcF1tqNAE



Thursday, April 2, 2009

2012 (2009)

2012 (2009)

Ever the optimist, let's go with the future disaster, end-of-the-world flick 2012 from the makers of Independence Day, 10000BC and (US) Godzilla. Oh, boy. All the rumors about the Mayan calendar predicting the end of days on December 21, 2012 are on display. Have at it and have fun. Enjoy.

Check it out here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R3C05jQUDYU

Wednesday, April 1, 2009

Dead Snow (2009)

Dod Sno – Dead Snow (2009)

Zombies. Zombie movies are universal. The idea of an undead corpse trying to eat you is globally frightening. Of course, the US is famous for them: “NOTLD,” “Dawn of the Dead,” “Return of the Living Dead.” Most other countries have their zombies too: UK “Shawn of the Dead”; Italy “Zombie”; Spain “Tomb of the Blind Dead”; France “The Living Dead Girl”; Japan “Versus”. Recently, Norway has spawned its entry into the mix: “Dod Sno” or Dead Snow (2009).

While I wouldn’t be surprised to find that Tommy Wirkola’s Dead Snow is not the first Norwegian zombie movie, it is the first one to receive the amount of hype and press it’s getting. The internet provides movie fans across the globe early access to posters, stills and trailers nowadays. Combine that and a spot a Sundance, Dead Snow garnered a early positive buzz. Recently, I was fortunate enough to see the film and was pleasantly surprised at what I found.

Dead Snow is a riot, a successful mix of gore and comedy with a likable cast and fun, if light, plot and beautifully realized zombies. The movie never takes itself too seriously and doesn’t try too hard to break any new ground. While never truly scary, the film is delightfully ghoulish and grand guignol, much like an early Raimi or Jackson joint.




Wirkola and his co-writer, Stig Frode Henriksen, wear their love for the horror genre on their sleeves, borrowing heavily from not only zombie films, but others such as Friday the 13th, Halloween and the Fog. Still it has its original moments: never have entrails been used so creatively. For example, one of our heroes dangles from a cliff holding on to the unraveled intestines of one zombie while fighting off another hanging along with him. Early on, the Nazi Zombies attack the local trapper (much like Crazy Ralph from Friday the 13th movies) in his tent a beautifully shot subtle and brutal scene. Later on, the big bad calls forth a barrage of undead soldiers with a howling cry; the ground shakes as they suddenly and violently erupt from the frozen tundra.

While the actors do their part well enough and are appropriately appealing , it’s the effects and set pieces that make this film work. The zombies themselves succeed wonderfully; the understated makeup allows the iconic costumes carry as much fear as dead rotting flesh should. Setting the carnage against the bright white of a snow covered landscape also emphasizes the absurdity and gore: bright, bright red blood and dark wartime clothing contrast sharply against brilliant white snow. There are also touches of promise in later scene, when Wirkola spends some time laying out a scene, placing his pieces on the movie board for optimal visual effect. My favorite scene has to be when the big bad and his minions corner our last-guy hero near a burnt-out pit.

For me, this movie was well balanced comedy horror film with great effects and gore. It is perfectly crafted for a world market too, setting up the plot in a familiar tone. This movie won’t overwhelm you with a dense plot and will deliver the goods. The last 30 minutes or so of Dead Snow continue to make me smile long after lights come back on and the popcorn is gone. Well done, Wirkola, well done.